The Future of Automotive Safety that can’t Come Soon Enough 

Modern technology is changing personal transportation at a staggering rate. Each year, the bar is raised in many areas, and this includes the automotive safety as well. Until recently, this was measured by the vehicle’s ability to protect the driver in the wake of the crash. But now, it is time to think beyond seatbelts, airbags and crash-tests. While some technologies still seem like concepts from science fiction movies, others are just around the corner. The future is now, and the auto revolution is on the roll.

Autonomy

One of the most exciting emerging trends is an autonomous vehicle. It drives anywhere using autopilot, operating without human oversight, or with driver commanding from a back seat. Google has successfully launched the Self-Driving project with prototype vehicles capable of safely navigating the cities. It might be a while until they become a common sight on the streets though.

For now, we have some technologies that bring us closer to autonomous vehicles. Like it or not, cars are able to disregard your commands and make their own decision. There are models with automatic braking, and with the advancements in the sensor technology, our four-wheeled friend will have a final say in situations when we are distracted by kids or pets.

Active window displays

Some cars in the past were manufactured with the green digits showing on their windshields, but now this is taken to the whole new level.  Windshields will start to resemble see-through TV displays with digital, transparent elements. Head-up Display (HUD) will be integrated into active glass, resulting in vibrant images.

Navigation systems will be highlighting the next turns, approaching vehicles, potential dangers and other data. Still, augmented reality will not distract the drivers. On the contrary, it will help them keep their eyes on the road. By providing essential data, it will also boost the safety considerably and reduce the number of accidents.

Health Monitoring

This tech does not focus on the driving process, but the person behind the wheel. Companies like Ford are already developing seatbelt and steering wheel sensors that will track vital, health-related data.  Furthermore, with the surge of wearable tech, vehicles will be able to connect to these devices and perform a variety of functions.

Add to that autonomous features, and you have an all-around safety system. For example, cars will stop in case of an emergency like heart attack, and call the paramedics. Drivers will not have to put their family in jeopardy and will survive worst case scenarios like this. We are also not very far from the moment when we will have a diagnostic dashboard doctors in vehicles.

Tyres of the future

Many people overlook the importance of components that connect cars with the road. Do not make the same mistake, and learn more about tyres in this post on Tyreright blog, which covers everything from history and trivia to handy tips. As for the manufacturers, they are giving it their best to enhance the overall safety with cutting-edge tyre techs.

Drivers will be able to determine the level of wear and tear merely looking at tyres, thanks to the changing colour feature.  What is more, self-regenerating, airless and self-inflating tyres will help drivers and their children stay on the safe side. Some of these solutions are already integrated in heavy machinery and military vehicles, so they may soon become available for commercial use.

Smart move 

Latest tech marvels are entering the showrooms around the world and shaping the future of the car industry. From colour-coded tyre technologies to the augmented reality, it is clear that driver’s safety is the backbone of the future developments. Your car will alarm you, look after your health, provide advice, and serve as a small, moving smart-home. This will also bring about the change in the way we perceive transportation and take the driving experience to new heights.

 

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