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Moving Into Your First House – Checklist

When thinking about starting your new life as a family, you automatically think about living in a big, spacious house. This has become a symbol of family life, and it sure beats the crowded apartments. But after you finally save enough money and find the right house, your job is far from done. Moving in is not just a simple physical transition phase – it requires some planning, especially if it’s your first time inside a house.

That’s why you shouldn’t move in right away, but consider staying in your apartment until the lease is up and use that time to turn your house in a place you can truly call home.

This doesn’t mean doing and buying everything at once – you’ll have to prioritize your tasks. To help you with this transition into a cozy family life, we’ve prepared the essential checklist.

Moving into first house checklist

1. Become a Sole Owner

Of course, the moment you sign the contract you’ll become an owner, but who knows how many people have keys of your new house, from previous owners and realtors to maintenance folks. The feeling of safety is one of our greatest needs, so the first thing to do is to replace your house door lock in order to make sure you and your family members are the only ones who’ll have the access. If you don’t have the time or skill to do it yourself pay a locksmith to do it, just don’t postpone this obligation because your peace of mind depends on it.

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2. Ensure Hygiene

Moving can be messy – many people will leave the house clean, but still, there are those who won’t, and proper hygiene is extremely important, especially if you have kids. Even if the previous owners have done the cleaning, you’ll want to clean everything again because the very process will make you feel good about your new house. No matter if you want to hire a service or perform the cleaning yourself, your first purchase should be one of the cleaning supplies – cleaners for each type of surface, a vacuum, mops, brooms, buckets, etc. Set up an area for this supplies and start early so you can get a job done at your own pace.

3. Organize

The main part of your new comfort lies in the fact that everything is in its place. You’ll probably have many boxes to unpack, so it’s mandatory to organize things right in order to eliminate the stress and make your life in the new house more enjoyable. The first thing is to check if the existing closets are outfitted to accommodate everything. If they’re just simple pole-and-shelf ones you should seriously consider purchasing some closet organizers.

If you’re not bringing a lot of furniture, you might think you need to buy a bunch of it right away to fill the place, but give yourself time to figure out the natural traffic patterns and gathering areas of your new home. Buying without previous thinking can block traffic between the rooms and make the place feel cramped, so give yourself at least a month before purchasing all extra stuff from your Amazon wishlist. And take it easy with decorations – they should come with new experiences and it would be a shame to realize you don’t have any wall space for your kids’ drawings.

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4. Make a Fertile Ground For Social Life

A house becomes a family nest only if it’s inviting. That’s why you need to think about things that will make your future guests comfortable. Your guest-friendly items don’t have to be luxurious – as with everything else, you should concentrate on essentials, such as trashcans with a lid in every bathroom. There will probably be occasions for a sleepover, so make sure you’re equipped with an extra set of bedding and adding a clock and mirror in your guest room is a nice extra touch. The most overlooked essentials are antenna installations – not only it’s mandatory for a fun game night with your buddies, but also for Sunday nights family movie when you want to cuddle up with your kids with a large bowl of popcorn. Just keep in mind that this installation process is very risky and should be left to professionals with appropriate training and certification, and don’t buy an antenna on your own since most of them on the retail market are made from cheap materials that are not long lasting and won’t provide a good signal.

Although you’ve purchased an already built house, moving in with your family is like building it again. The above-mentioned steps are the foundation – security, hygiene, organization, and a warm welcome. After you set that up, just living inside it will slowly turn it into a place called home.

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