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4 Must-Read Tips Before Starting a Landscaping Business

According to the Horticultural Trades Association, the UK ornamental horticulture and landscaping industry is worth an estimated £28.2 billion and creates approximately 674,200 jobs.

Therefore, it makes perfect sense you might want to secure a share of the figures, especially if you love to flex your green fingers at work or during your spare time. Yet, you will need much creativity, physical skills, and business acumen to run a successful venture.

If you are ready to turn your skills into an outdoor empire, here are four must-read tips before starting a landscaping business.

1. Seek Training

Don’t underestimate the level of creativity, hard work and skills involved in landscaping. As much as you might enjoy tending to your garden at home, transitioning your skills to match customers’ wants and needs is a big jump. 

If your business is to be a success, you will need to train as a landscaper or hire professionals to serve your customers.Professional landscapers will need in-depth expertise across various areas, such as:

  • Groundsmanship
  • Building
  • Paving
  • Decking
  • Joinery
  • Drainage and irrigation
  • Stonework
  • Water features

If you want to be able to give more to your customers you can even train in pool/pond construction, giving their garden a centerpiece to focus on and use. If you don’t know where to start you can use resources from companies like Premier Franchise Management to help you provide the best service and gain knowledge of the field. Another thing you will need is extensive knowledge of plants and must understand where they can and can’t grow. Plus, you must know how to handle fertilisers, pesticides, and other chemicals to create a safe environment for everyone while supporting the ecosystem. In the same vein, you should also be well aware of your legal rights and duties in your new occupation and should take out insurance for landscaping businesses to cover the safety of yourself, any of your employees, your clients, and your equipment.

Also, you will need extensive knowledge of plants and must understand where they can and can’t grow. Plus, you must know how to handle fertilisers, pesticides, and other chemicals to create a safe environment for everyone while supporting the ecosystem. In the same vein, you should also be well aware of your legal rights and duties in your new occupation and should take out insurance for landscap

2. Write a Detailed Business Plan

After you have gained the appropriate knowledge and skills, you can turn your attention towards kickstarting your landscaping company. It is wise to write a detailed business plan before getting your venture off the ground, as it could help your company secure investment and serve as a reference guide to your business’s finances, marketing, customer acquisition costs, revenue goals and more. You may also want to consider landscape design software costs provided by business such as https://www.softwarerepublic.com/.

3. Pick a Dependable, Commercial Vehicle

As a professional landscaper, you must travel to various customers’ properties to transform their exterior designs. For this reason, you must invest in a dependable, spacious and professional vehicle to improve organisation, attend appointments on schedule, and impress your customer base. If you are unsure about the best make and model for your landscaping business, you would be smart to consider one of the Transit Custom vans available. Reliable, tough and spacious, you will enjoy a smooth, hassle-free journey to each customer’s address, and it will have plenty of space to house your landscaping equipment.

4. Invest in High-quality Landscaping Tools

Starting a landscaping business typically costs between £5,000 to £10,000, which you must factor into your business plan. Most of the money should be spent on high-quality landscaping tools, such as:

  • A professional petrol mower
  • Wheelbarrow
  • Shears
  • Leaf blower
  • Strimmer
  • Spade
  • Fork
  • Garden kneeler
  • Trowel
  • Plant feeder and food
  • Gloves

If your budget is tight, buy second-hand materials until you can afford to replace them, and care for them daily to help the items stand the test of time. Also, rent heavy-duty equipment on a per-project basis over buying them outright to minimise your overheads when starting the company.

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